Hermantown native turned Nashville singer-songwriter Rafe Carlson is going viral on TikTok and it's all thanks to a sweet tribute he shared over the weekend. The beautiful background probably didn't hurt, either!

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Rafe shared an acoustic cover of The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald, a song made famous by Gordon Lightfoot. The TikTok was done in honor of the anniversary of the wreck, which happened on November 10th of 1975 during a terrible storm. Twenty-people lost their lives on board that day.

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As a Northlander, Rafe knew the importance of this event and wanted to honor those that lost their lives, while bringing light to this important piece of Minnesota history. He took to the shores of the lake to share his own version of the famous tune with just his guitar and the William A. Irvin in the backdrop

The video has gone viral thanks to his killer vocals and the ominous Lake Superior in the background. The sky is also gloomy, which gives the whole video an eerie feel. So far, the video has been viewed tens of thousands of times.

Many people also weighed in on the comments, writing their own connection to the sunken ship. Others were freaking out about how awesome the cover is, while others admired the Irvin in the background.

Rafe has garnered a pretty big following on TikTok, with nearly sixteen-thousand followers at the time of writing and counting. His videos collectively have amassed almost three-million likes.

RELATED: Nine Famous Lake Superior Shipwrecks

He has been keeping very busy, currently touring all over the midwest. He keeps active on social media, sharing new songs and tour dates. He even opened for Jon Pardi at Bayfront Festival Park earlier this year! We can't wait to see what he does next.

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